How Japanese Anime Pass Through History?

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Jan 042019
 

Japanese anime of the time of birth has a slightly simple and richly symbolic drawing

The two-minute work of painter Kouchi Junichi revolves around a silly samurai who bought a blunt blade, he has to overcome many challenges in exchange for another sophisticated sword. Did you realize the similarity of ideas of many popular anime like Bleach, Naruto, Fairy Tail … compared to your “grandfather”? Yes, these films have a plot with the main characters always undergoing many challenges to achieve what they want.

However, some studies suggest that the product is called Katsudou Shashin, which is the precursor to the later anime. The video is a picture of a sailor wearing a film title on the board. So far, no one has found the identity of the person who made this work.

The first internationally famous anime is Momotaro (Peach Boy) developed by Kitayama artist Seitaro based on folk tales. In the story, two grandparents picked up a peach in the stream. When taking home, there was a boy who came out from digging out, growing as fast as blowing and becoming a famous general in Japan.
However, Japanese animation has not become a popular form of entertainment, let alone discussing an extremely successful work of Snow White (Snow White and Seven Dwarfs) of Walt Disney tree. It was not until the 1960s that an outstanding pioneer appeared like Tezuka Osamu.
The 70s also marked manga (comics), light novels (Japanese short novels) and anime (anime) began to be received. Many manga and anime created during this time have become monuments in the otaku community’s mind. These works mostly reflect the positive thinking of Japanese people. For example, the story of cat Doraemon and the boys of the same class as Nobita is drawn by artists Fujimoto Hiroshi and Abiko Motoo (Fujiko Fujio group) meaning to encourage team spirit, friendship and effort rising above poverty of Japanese people.

Japanese Animation Imbued with Romance and Sadness

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Dec 222018
 

Japanese animation has long conquered viewers from all over the world, not only by creativity but also by images, sound and meaningful messages in each film. If you are looking for a meaningful movie, not only for entertainment, but also for contemplating life, love, and sadness, here are 5 films from the solar country. Grows that you will not be missed.

The Garden of Words

The Garden of Words was released on May 31, 2013, directed by Shinkai Makoto. The story revolves around Akizuki Takao, a student who is going through a boring day at school and believes that “only shoes can bring me out of this place”. Then one morning in the rainy season, he skimmed off to a garden to sketch a shoe model and met a woman sitting watching the rain fall – Yukino Yukari. The next morning of the rain, they met again and gradually became close, began a love with the rain falling and then ended it with sunlight.

Tamako Love Story

A film produced by Kyoto Animation and directed by Naoko Yamada, is a cute and youthful love story, which is considered the next film series of the 12-episode Tamako Market launched in early 2013. Ministry The film was created with the aim of bringing a complete ending rather than the unfinishedness that the long film brought. The plot revolves around the growing awareness and affection of two young friends from Tamako and Mochizou, especially when the two are about to graduate from high school and step away from the guise of school time to catch head worried about the future.

5 Centimeters Per Second

Another anime on the list was directed by Shinkai Makoto and CoMix Wave, which marked his name in Asian and world cinema. The story revolves around the relationship of a boy named Tono Takaki with Akari Shinohara – he has his code since he was in school in the 1990s, until now, but there is always one between them distance and often only contact each other remotely via mail or phone.

Into The Forest of Fireflies Light

Adapted from the manga of the same name by Midorikawa Yuki, directed by Takahiro Omori, the film’s main character is Hotaru, a girl who once wanders into the forest meets Gin, a monster, a god or a human. normal? It was not all, people only knew that Gin was a strange boy, when he was touched by humans, he would disappear, Gin took Hotaru out of the forest and their story began from there.

The Gods Gotta Get Paid

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Dec 082018
 

A lot’s been said about Soredemo’s final episode. Yeah, it was all genuinely touching and all. Hotori seems to kick the bucket and she gets to see everyone’s reactions while chilling in Japanese Afterlife. It was all well put-together for this sort of deliberate emotional tearjerking sort of thing. Hell, even my own black heart kinda felt a slight tinge of the old sadness there.

But that same dark, bleak, cynical heart took great joy in this ending. Not because Hotori nearly croaked (I rather like the obnoxious brat, so I wouldn’t want to see her get it.), but because of why she was able to come back from the dead.

Her father bribed the gods.

Watch how the events play out. Hotori bites it, goes through all the motions, and is given a tour of the afterlife (Nippon-flavored). As far as the bureaucratic “angel” dudes knew, she was here for good. It wasn’t until after her dad rushed over to the temple and dumped his entire wallet into the offering dealiemajig that Hotori got a reprieve. As soon as her dad laid down some bills, all of a sudden word comes down the pipe that some sort of ‘technicality” is allowing her to go back to the realm of the living. I don’t think the timing of all of this is any accident. The gods want their moolah, and only then will your prayers be answered. It really brightens my nasty little heart seeing that.

It’s that sort of flippant, nigh-nihilistic attitude that I’ve really dug about Soredemo. The series spends its entire final episode building up to what you assume is going to be a touching, dramatic, emotional moment, but when you look back at it all you see that all of those emotions were given the proverbial middle finger by trivializing it all. Sure, peeps get to cry and bemoan Hotori’s fate and all that, but in the end it isn’t their feelings for her that saves her– it’s that wad of cash that gets “offered” to the gods.

And that’s pretty representative of the series’ attitude towards everything. It revels in its inconsequential nature. People get brought back from the dead because of pocket change. Aliens appear and battle it out with nary a thought given to them after the fact. Ghosts roam the earth, and their aimless wandering is made the butt of a joke. Time travel is casually tossed around, as if we should say “Yeah, this shit really does exist in the future!” It has the same sort of attitude as Occult Academy in the way it undermines the dramatic and exposing such “deep” notions as being no less trivial as everything else. Your tears of sorrow and your shock at the existence of the supernatural and all those other significant moments really don’t matter in the grand scheme of things, because this shit just keeps on going.

And you laugh your ass off when you realize this.

5 Most Worth Watching Japanese Film

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Dec 062018
 

1. The Taste of Tea (2004) – Taste of tea
 
The Taste of Tea The is a famous science fiction film of Japan. The Taste of Tea is a version of Fanny And Alexander that tells the story of a family’s daily life with different generations. This is considered to be the most worth seeing movie in the early 21st century
 
The Taste of Tea was built around the story of the Haruno family living in an old house in a sprawling, barren suburb of Tokyo. The family has six people all: 1 couple, 2 children, 1 grandfather and 1 uncle, each with their own story.

 2. Linda Linda Linda (2005)

Linda Linda Linda is the musical film directed by Nobuhiro Yamashita ranked sixth in the list of the 10 best films of 2005 in Japan.
The film about a girl group born before the music festival of the school 3 days fell into a shortage of singers singing the main internal conflict. While the members were desperate, they stumbled across a Korean student who sang “Linda linda linda” for Blue Hearts and the group she sang for the group. They practiced together with many bad jokes, the group also understood each other and cross country friendship more thoroughly.

Due to exhaustive training they missed the festival and had to perform at the last minute but the four girls still played their best and won the hearts of audiences.

3. Water Flowers, Hanamizuki 2010
 
Hanamizuki is a song about love that faces time and distance. The film is based in Hokkaido Japan. Hirasawa Sae, a high school student, is not happy to grow up with both parents, when her father died when she was very young.
 
The flowering plant was planted when Sae’s childhood became his father’s identity, Sae always cherish the desire to succeed, so she constantly strives to pass a prestigious university in Tokyo.


4. Nobody Knows (2004) – Dare mo shiranai

 
From a true event of “four abandoned children in Sugamo” and during 15 years of persistent script development, director Hirokazu Kore-eda released Nobody Knows. “Nobody Knows” is about a mother and four children living in an apartment that no one else knows. Four children are hardly allowed out, not in school.

 5. Memories of Matsuko (2006)

Memories of Matsuko in Vietnamese is Matsuko’s Memoirs produced based on the novel of the same name by Muneki Yamada. The film is the story of Matsuko Kawajiri’s life.

Studio Ghibli – Legend of The Japanese Animation Industry

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Nov 202018
 

Ghibli is like the dream of Japanese anime, founded by talented and deeply devoted musicians Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata. Despite starting a career and then growing up from making anime films for television, the two directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata are determined to focus their attention on their long-running feature films. cinema screens.
The famous Japanese animated feature film studio, Ghibli. Ghibli’s films not only created box office fever in Japan, but also won in the harshest movie markets like the United States. Ghibli is the animated feature film Land of the Souls (2001), the only non-English-language film to receive the Oscars for Best Animated Feature Film of 2002. For the prestigious IMDB movie five of Ghibli’s works are among the top 10 best animated films of all time.

What makes Ghibli so successful?

Always aim for children.

Hayao Miyazaki once stated, “Animation should be a form of entertainment, and its purpose is to serve children. That is what I always think “. Hayao Miyazaki is always loyal to his point of view. His films are first of all highly entertaining with an engaging storyline, not a heavy film or carry messages that are difficult to understand.

Have a clear message and purpose
The message in his films never came out in the character’s voice, but always let the viewer feel himself.

Beautiful picture
Ghibli’s films are famous for their hand-drawn images. It can be said that Hayao Miyazaki is a traditional painter, he hates drawing by computer or technique, because they lose the value of each character.

Build character close to the viewer
Hayao Miyazaki has always put female figures at the center. It can be said that Ghibli’s female characters are ordinary girls.

How to write a unique script
“The scriptwriter must know what he wants in the film. The path of the story must be as simple and clear as a solid tree.” That is his point of view to write a unique script.

The concept of filmmaking and how Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata’s films have produced a variety of anime. They use positive thoughts, perspectives and talents to make beautiful films of visual art, perfect content, making audiences around the world of sympathetic and love.